Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Slinging: Simple Rotational Dynamics Applied

About slinging.  It's basic rotational dynamics.  Need I say more?  The sling has three parts.  The pocket, the stay, and the trigger.  The stay and the trigger are the two ropes attached to the pocket, and as you would imagine from the names, the stay is the rope you hold on to, and the trigger is the one that you release.  Now WHEN you release it is the MAIN issue.  To make things simple, imagine yourself throwing a baseball, and for this example, picture yourself watching yourself throw from the side.  You wind up, your arm goes traces a circle over your head and your wrist snaps and releases at the top of your swing, at the top of the arc.  But the ball doesn't go up, it goes forward... roughly 90 degrees from the place your released it.  Now imagine that that same ball is on a tether.  As you are swinging the ball in a circle, each moment of the ball's circular travel, it yearns to travel in a straight line... but at there is a competing force.  At the same time the tether overpowers the ball's yearning and keeps the ball consistently turning around the circle.  The tether pulls the ball towards the center of this circle where you are holding the tether.  So when you release the tether, it loses all ability to overpower the ball's yearning to go forward.  So at the moment you release the tether, the ball will get it's wish and travel in a straight line that is perpendicular (90 degrees) to the line formed by the tether at that moment.   Slinging is the same way, when you release the trigger, the pocket opens and the ball will travel in a straight line from that moment on.  See... simple rotational  dynamics.

Load it, Swing it, Release it.
slingmoore@gmail.com

15 comments:

  1. lol....you make it sound so-simple!

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  2. isn't it though? All you have to do is consider celestial ballistic motion as it applies to the simple rotational dynamics of your sling and your good to go

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  3. perhaps if you have studied physics....

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  4. how do you know which is the stay and which is the trigger? or does it matter?

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  5. Chris the stay has a little dowel rod I call the stay rod which you hold on to, and the trigger has a little bead which is easy to hold and release. Plus I usually have a knot up near the pocket on one side or the other depending on how the construction goes so that you always know which side you're holding.

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  6. oh, ok i see
    thank you

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  7. do you know what time my sling will be done?

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  8. Yes I do, I'll finish it tomorrow (Sat.), I've cut all the leather and the cord, I'll put them together. And it'll be on it's way...

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  9. ok, thank you very much

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  10. welcome, I'm looking forward to getting them done.

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  11. so it is done, should i send you the money tommorrow?

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  12. It's done... shall I send you a money request?

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  13. i think i know what it is, but if you send the request along with how to get it to you, you should have it before the end of Monday

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  14. Chris, send an email to slingmoore@gmail.com I need your email address to send you the payment request.

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  15. Mr. Moore,
    We were in Port Townsend for the Wooden Boat Show, and we got back today. my sling had arrived, so i took it to the park to test it. I decided to use a tennis ball, because I figured that it would not be as likely to break windows, and it would hurt less. Well, a friend of the family was at the park, and it turns out that that is one of his hobbies, so he gave me a few tips. (like slinging on the side instead of overhead to begin with) i got the tennis ball to go about 100 ft...pretty good for a tennis ball going against the wind. Soon i had a line of kids wanting to try it. So i just wanted to thank you very much, as everyone had a lot of fun.

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